Integrating Services and Why Google Doesn’t Bother Me

Integrating Services and Why Google Doesn’t Bother Me

Every couple of months I go to see a short little man who works at the Nordstrom’s in Charlotte to talk work clothes and usually buy a few shirts, a pair of pants or two and sometimes a pair of shoes.  I know that Nordstrom’s is not the cheapest place to buy any of these and I often supplement this clothing with clothes from other stores.  What I like about shopping with this guy is that he knows my style and I can trust his judgement.

We don’t just talk about clothes he’s got in stock either.  I tell him about things I’ve bought other places and he is nice enough to compare and contrast things he has in stock with things that are available at other stores.  This gives him better insight in to me as a person and, yes, probably leads to additional sales for him, but they are sales that I am happier with.  I expect this from him, he wouldn’t be my go to Sales guy without it.

I expect the same from my technology.  If I make a post on Google+ at a location in Charlotte and 10 seconds later do a search on maps, I would hope to find it in the context of the check-in.  If later Google Tracks logs a run for me through Pittsburgh, I’d hope to see the search a little differently.  If I add a new email contact, I would hope that Google+ would suggest that the guy might be a friend, and that I might want to share some pictures with him on Picasa.

These are all good things as far as I’m concerned, now I know that they also are things that are going to lead to more and different advertising but I can’t just expect Google to do all this work for free, can I?  Advertising is how they make their money and like any product or service, you have to balance the value to you with the cost (in this case the cost is having to see ads and a forfeiture of the “right” to segregate).