Live TV Fights Back

Live TV Fights Back

Live television is more profitable then recorded or “On Demand” television.  People have no choice but to sit through the ads, and that means the advertisers pay more money if people watch your show live.  The problem is, people have lives (and they don’t like ads).  I’ve argued before that both this tendency and social media application’s like GetGlue ability to make asynchronous TV watching social will spell the end for live TV (besides news and sports).  Well, live TV has fought back in two very interesting ways, and I thought it was worth pointing out here:

  1. While tablets give people the opportunity to watch shows on Netflix or On Demand and would have at first appeared to be a threat to Live TV, a closer look shows something else.  Products like yap.tv and i.tv and even Twitter with hash tags have made watching live television a real-time social experience.  I still think that there is the potential to morph in to groups of friends deciding to watch a show on their own time, but for now it promotes only Live TV.
  2. One of the reasons for this is that the networks are encouraging the community around live watchers of their show.  I noticed the other day that Daniel Tosh (one of the most popular people on Twitter), live tweets his own show and even engages viewers there.  So, if you want to watch the show with Daniel, there’s only one time slot.
I don’t know whether these methods will be enough or whether the networks will come up with any other tricks, but for now I’m not as convinced as I used to be that TV will become completely asynchronous.